Category: Poetry

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Remembering The Brownstone

By | Poetry

I want the ring of its iron steps, ten or eight of them, under my feet— the paint banished, the banister not quite secure, the city stuttering around me like a homeless wind. I want to hurry up those steps again, through the double oak dark doors tall and heavy as God, want to enter the rooms greeting me like strangers— aloof, always on the verge of leaving, shrugging into their polite coats.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Exile

By | Poetry

translated from Slovenian by Andrew Zawacki and the author Like lover’s juice spat by a woman for hire, they’re driven by desperate, radiant light, far away down the deserted plains, to columns of people traveling, tired, past the ruins of town hall and the cathedral, past walls that barely differ from the stones themselves covered by moss, past the meadows where trespass is not allowed. Crossing the former trenches, the weakest among them had seen the towers of smoke rising from camp fires under the forest line. Their translucent eyes reflect only shadows of clouds gliding over the narrow trails they’re walking down, they conjure pastures and fertile valleys, moments of sheer delight, they dream of large estates, expertly manicured. Water sources camouflaged by the coarse facade of rocks, they stand at the edge of a steep ravine that flats their echo out, like a blasé god with slack fists, and dazed. Keep their eyes closed, on a fragile crag they slough their jackets, patched together of rough flax, and lie down on their backs, in comfort, vests slither over their heads, their trousers over their ankles drop to a quivering pile. Naked under familiar gray, in the narrow funnel of mountains they see it, for the last time: these drugged women and children, with faces of stillborn animals, the big moon above, a small village below, and me—we all need to know why.

Three Poems

By | Poetry

The Sun Stands Still Who what where when why in the dark dark dark dark dark broken-boiler night would I suddenly start up thinking of you, happiness? Equestrian frost-shapes send your empty-handed mute messengers riding straight at the glass. Snow replaces obvious fake snow, spray-on snow, Styrofoam. Lacy soft unlatched fish scales and cabbage-white wings nostalgically settle on gargoyles outside. Three dimensions, including happiness, glitter under ice.   Loneliest Parakeet One less tenant, white onion-dome cage, one caught soul flown.  Rained on funeral rituals (humming, nettles brushing shoulders) give gravediggers crud to shovel. Residual breast-feathers drift through room with faint shit-like odor of cigar smoke. So the widower experiences parthenogenesis: Blue-green faces/faces/faces in facing mirrors-with-bells: motionless, mute colony. I replace what the Thief steals every several seasons, flickers, bubbles, dew. Children christen newest body-double “Cherry Blossom.” Cherry Blossom stiffens near bride/groom.  Uncostumed, everyone adheres to his/her twig, biding time, wondering— edible, loveable, lethal? Autumn leaves, these fly-by-night loves.   Haunted House Knock-knock— who’s there?— You Know Who— You Know Who wh—! No more fire-opal October light. Coq-a-l’anes twist-tied to neglected dollar store cobwebs—slow-decomposing leaf hammocks, cradles of plastic skulls long ago glow-in-the-dark, graves of fairy lights, paper hearts, sparklers, solstice-markers now unglittery, lately unelectric— one misfit roof tile acting alone might tear all decorations down and toneless skeleton-tree operettas hound again. Even in struck dumb snout and dusty ears cocked spider handiwork. Tell me again, how came we to live with candelabra antlers, glass eyed mortuary beauty spellbinding our hallway? We never understood clocks, so hung a head where the clock belonged. …

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Blue Afternoon: The Middle Distance

By | Poetry

I need more light now than when I was young, holding books at that middle distance to let bifocals do their work. As a result I find myself, when I look up from the page, gazing unfocused into something I can’t quite see the name for. It takes a moment, now, to make the shift from close detail, from the word, to whatever’s out the window. Summer at the beach, I am rapt with distance, book on the sand beside me while I stare and stare not at the lace of waves or shells that wash in and drift back out a few times before depositing themselves quietly below the tideline, but at the blue on blue horizon line, the faint haze that obscures the farthest ships, the Boston skyline I saw once on the clearest afternoon, or thought I did. I stare at nothing with a form, at a whisper, at a fade from blue to gray to duller blue then blue again. I don’t know what it is I think I see but there is plenty of it, this light, every light, the long blue afternoon, my eyes at rest past the struggle of the middle distance, past the insect words that quiver on the page, past everything but light and light itself, beyond the blurred horizon and all the visible names of things.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Three Poems

By | Poetry

Jebby Eldon I found Jebby Eldon drowning and fished him out crazy like sand scuffed into wood. A year later he plays music at Midkiff’s Bar, plays jazz that scrambles pale smoke into some wild, clanky riffs. Sometimes he helps me load the barge or takes his old mutt hound hunting grouse on his daddy’s farm, where birds fly out like pine needles in a devil breeze, and blue lizards rustle across a rock bluff like fossils chiseled from midair. Jebby shoots nothing, just laughs along the lake fence where he should be dead. He tells me a young albino owl has pulled its wings from a pine knot, has fringed all its howling into another man’s life. Jebby says I shoulda left him water-logged.   The Capehill Barge I float some cars to the island. Jebby says they’ll be the last ridden across Capehill’s flat crater pig path, moonlight frizzing into snow and pumice. The barge stays cold tonight and its shaky steel has flowered against Old Moody’s Landing like a rusty package swapped for some stars and music. But Jebby sings his money and I sing some crablegs and brew, a sour breezy comfort with our haul, with all these trembled beach cabins paled for another night’s Christmas.   The Prize Bull Hobey and Jebby raced one night, caught the slant of a roof, and flew their dirt bikes past Ruben Coyle’s prize bull. They yelped like fools haunted by the deepest, coldest mud sunk in a thaw. And the bull roughed at them like a tank, knocked Hobey against a fence post, bounced Jebby two flips against a cattle guard. I laughed three days after I patched them. Made their eyes look like one slow twitching burl-knot hating sunlight. They slumped to Betty’s house, and she laughed, too—said the air won’t breathe itself without some jokes, and here’s two fine ones, joined in their bruises. I hear the boys done raced again on Coyle’s land. I hear the bull has started goring shadows.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Three Poems (in translation)

By & | Poetry

Telemachus Telemachos Das Gemach meines Vaters öffnete sich zweimal, hob dann auf Flügeln ab. Ich bin die Sirene, Vater— Du der Schall. Gegen die Stille—Wundsporen. Ein Schrei kann die Grabenwand nicht durchdringen. Er wird, er wird benannt, er wird Stein genannt.   Telemachus My father’s room opened twice, then wing-lifted. I am the Siren, father— you, the sound. Against stillness—wound spores. A cry cannot penetrate the rift-wall. It is, it is named, it is named stone.   Herr Antschel Herr Antschel Mit Deinem Übersetzerhandbuch— eine gekerbte Rippe, eine gekrümmte Schaufel. Dein Talmud beinah ein Augenlid. Auf der Veranda, das fast Gesagte gefüllt mit Schweigen. Der Wortköder abdriftend. Du hast mich hierher geführt als die Hoffnung dahinschwand. Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin? Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin?   Herr Antschel With your translator’s book— a notched rib, a kneed shovel. Your Talmud half like an eyelid. On the porch, your almost-mouthed, filled with silence. The wordbait drifting. …

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Six Days of Snow

By | Poetry

Push aside the screen door and see strata upon strata of snow. Notice the elemental shifts in light, a palette of backlit whites lined with blue-gray where each snowfall stopped and the next started, a dutiful record of its own making. It is the laying on of snow upon sleep, upon bulbs put there by hands, upon tunnels through soil and the breathing fur within them. Snow laying itself down upon sleeping you, a sleep not solved by light. You through whom light fell onto me.  That was how it happened once. Light fell through you, and I came awake.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Jason With Me at the Zoo The summer night is radiantly cool. You’d have liked it. You’d have loved the chili-pepper of the rose, white daisies at the zoo, the shell’s roseate innards, the orangey scarlet ibis picking his lit way along the wood-chip path and penguins flittering through the pond like bats. “Flying is a kind of swimming,” someone wrote; but swimming is a kind of flying, too, and you were a mighty swimmer, but now you hold so still where you lie nailed to the ground, your eyes up against the pine, your beautiful jaw uptilted like a man who can’t get enough of gazing at the stars spangled across the summer sky so that he tightly shuts his lids and will not open them again.   God’s Leash God’s leash is on me. The last time I touched you it seemed you were already more than halfway his. I did not believe you would outlast the night. You said goodbye in the hospital corridor, as if you might still, somehow, shake off the holy collar like a priest laying down his robe. You stumbled at the door as full of running sores as Job. Perhaps you were on your way somewhere you wanted to be when G-d said heel and dragged you to shore.