Category: Poetry

Issue 1 | Summer 2007

Reverend Levi Healy, Missionary to Cambodia, Delivers the Dedication Address for the New, New Baptist Church of Angkor

By | Poetry

We are not pessimists. We believe in the power of God above all things. Exodus: I held half a dozen figs in one hand. That was the night we ran, the night giant roots stalked the jungle floor like ivory poachers, the night roots wrapped our walls and nudged at the foundations—they pierced the stone weak, caught the pieces as they fell. Merciful Lord, the pieces did not fall. Take a moment to locate the exit doors, but do not worry. We are better now; our pillars no longer carved, balanced things but roots extending deeply, firmly, far into the ground. We’ve installed amplified sound sets, and the figs— some are as big as my head, require two hands. This is a celebration. No one fled, not one of us, as roots like ungroomed fingers hugged our chests. Genesis: our ribs were plucked and replaced, bone for cellulose. We lived, praise God, to make better preparations. Revelation: seven plagues will come upon us. Platinum-level donors will be given flame retardant suits and capes made of Kevlar, anodized steel cups for their genitals. Jesus was crucified but saved himself that He might sit at the Lord’s right hand, that we might live faithfully. Chain restraints will bind members to their seats should Satan’s lizards invade the sanctuary. Ceiling jets will spew insecticide in the event termites lurk hungry for lignin, our skeletons.

Issue 1 | Summer 2007

I was five. My mother and father fought often enough for me to believe

By | Poetry

there was a world I couldn’t fix.  I stuffed my wet sheets in the chute most mornings and did anything but drift down to the kitchen, dark on one side and light on the other, my bowl of cereal waiting for me.  Their love for me was immense, measured, I suppose, by their need for me to look away from failure. Theirs.  Mine.  I studied the wallpaper, the repeating trees of winter drawn with pen and ink. Bleak and, for this reason, beautiful, to someone whose pain was both present and postponed, the stripped-down trees paralleled my small venture down the stairs.  I look at the scar on my arm from the time I ran down those stairs and crashed through the glass door.  The old seam of skin widens then fades into the palm’s history of guilt and guilt’s evasion.  The cut came when my arm snapped back through the jagged glass.  Now my mother and father float above me,  cloth white bandages covering their flawed eyes.

Issue 3 | Summer 2008

Night Crossing

By | Poetry

dragonflies by the hundreds outlined my oars     I breathed easily     my aura unsheathed spirit on the river     clouds scudded the moon but then into this scene     a dead woman on her back grew closer her undulating hair the dragonflies vanished     I stilled my oars all was dark     but a scatter of stars the dead one begged     would I lift her aboard bury her in childhood or beyond the river where she might find herself before she left me….  my blade charred     to amber wherever it touched her I could not inter her nor not forgive her & as I rowed     the dragonflies returned river memory     stilled her I rowed like an angel     with flaming wings my boat crossed over     into pure singing William Heyen is a Professor of English and Poet in Residence Emeritus at SUNY Brockport, his undergraduate alma mater. A former Senior Fulbright Lecturer in American Literature in Germany, he has won prizes and fellowships from the NEA, the Guggenheim Foundation, Poetry, and the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. His work has appeared in hundreds of magazines and anthologies.

Issue 3 | Summer 2008

The Blessing of the Old Woman, the Tulip, and the Dog

By | Poetry

To be blessed said the old woman is to live and work so hard God’s love washes right through you like milk through a cow To be blessed said the dark red tulip is to knock their eyes out with the slug of lust implied by your up-ended skirt To be blessed said the dog is to have a pinch of God inside you and all the other dogs can smell it Alicia Ostriker, a poet and critic, has published eleven volumes of poetry, including The Volcano Sequence and No Heaven. Her poetry has appeared in The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Paris Review, Yale Review, Ontario Review, The Nation, and many other journals and anthologies, and has been translated into numerous languages including Hebrew and Arabic. Twice a National Book Award finalist, she has also received awards from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, the Poetry Society of America, the San Francisco Poetry Center, and the Paterson Poetry Center, among others.

Issue 3 | Summer 2008

What’s Ours

By | Poetry

it may be that a long time ago, as a baby, we chose the way we tasted sugar felt cotton and heard Bessie Smith at 3 a.m. in the back of a dream sitting at a table below a yellow lamp. we blinked our eyes then had to live between those soft parentheses drinking wine or tearing at someone’s heart and nightly laying our bodies down to see a piece surrendered that made us sane, made us hunger for the span of some girl’s back peering behind her, humming a chorus. there are hues of light we’ll never see, too subtle the taste of pepper. but maybe if we rest tonight say these names, feel their weight, as your thigh touches my thigh we can drink that blood, taste that pepper and sing Bessie Smith like no one can lying together in the burning, lovely night. David Waite is a graduate of the Master of Fine Arts program from Goddard College where he studied under the poet Beatrix Gates.  He has poems forthcoming in Greensilk Journal and Children, Churches and Daddies and published articles on creative writing for the website Poet’s Ink.  He is currently the assistant editor for Poet’s Ink Review and a writing professor in the Syracuse, NY, area.

Issue 3 | Summer 2008

What the Sous Chef Knows

By | Poetry

is the eventual Braille brought on by cut onions – the stick of garlic on skin, and how its husk leaves the bulb like a sheath off her knife. The combination to the meat locker, and how much filet to clean on Wednesday afternoons, that her line cooks are always right no matter what the stiffshirts out front say. She knows how starch in the air can taste like its giver, potato releasing the earth, pasta, broccoli stems – asparagus snaps. How to make the most of the thinnest tuna loin. She knows how to sew her own thumb closed – which dishwasher to let go, which to take home. Timeless dreams of slicing. Cold, solo sheets. The sun on set, cooled outside her restaurant’s back door screen, nothing about it rare, or done well; how to crack an egg in each hand and flick those goddamn shells into that steel sink without even her eyes. Runner-up in the Iowa Review Prize, Jesse Waters is currently a visiting assistant professor at Elizabethtown College. His fiction, poetry and essays have appeared in such journals as 88: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry, The Adirondack Review, The Cortland Review, Cimarron Review, Plainsongs, Magma, Southeast Review and Sycamore Review. Next June he’ll be writer- in-residence for Partners of the Americas in the Bahia region of Brazil.

Issue 3 | Summer 2008

The Girl Who Turned Cartwheels

By | Poetry

It’s dusk. And dry. Boys in the neighborhood ride their bikes, back tires kicking up dust, spokes spinning like the cartwheels I turned that summer those kids disappeared. For hours every day, I too, vanished without explanation. The rails are better than school balance beams, I explained, coming home with blood on my elbows, cinders in my knees. My aunt clutched her rosary beads, prayed to Saint Nicholas. My mother hugged me. And then had nightmares. I felt trapped in a car trunk, she said to my father, sure I wasn’t listening. I didn’t understand the crime done so far away, the local girl and her kids now gone. I just practiced more — until my back was straight, until my arms locked tight, until I no longer fell. When my fingers burned on the August steel, I moved to the shade. Only the sumac noticed, bowing to my dismounts, applauding through the rustle of dry leaves. I didn’t stop until the rails trembled. I was sure ghosts were there, somewhere, making the metal beneath my fingers, my hands, my toes, tremble. Karen J. Weyant lives and teaches in Western New York. A 2007 Fellow in Poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts, her most recent work can be seen or is forthcoming in 5 AM, Barn Owl Review, The Comstock Review, the minnesota review, and Slipstream. Her first chapbook, Stealing Dust, is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press in early 2009.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

1945

By | Poetry

The war in Europe is over. Russians met Americans on the bridge across the Elbe and it is over. I have seen pictures in LIFE of bodies burned at Gardelegen. I have read about captured girls my age that Nazis kept in brothels. The Mona Lisa will return to the Louvre. My father in his chair beside the lamp reads the news. Now children who asked, “Will bombs fall on us?” can look at the sky without fear. Stretched on the floor, I am reading PERSUASION. Mother has put a cake in the oven, chocolate. She’ll call us to come taste it. The globe of the world my father found in a second-hand store has been installed, a glass globe with a light inside and only one flaw, a crack running from the North Pole to Madagascar. Crickets are singing under the open windows. A warm evening with dusk slowly falling. The globe shines in the dark beside the bookcase.