Category: Poetry

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Three Poems (in translation)

By & | Poetry

Telemachus Telemachos Das Gemach meines Vaters öffnete sich zweimal, hob dann auf Flügeln ab. Ich bin die Sirene, Vater— Du der Schall. Gegen die Stille—Wundsporen. Ein Schrei kann die Grabenwand nicht durchdringen. Er wird, er wird benannt, er wird Stein genannt.   Telemachus My father’s room opened twice, then wing-lifted. I am the Siren, father— you, the sound. Against stillness—wound spores. A cry cannot penetrate the rift-wall. It is, it is named, it is named stone.   Herr Antschel Herr Antschel Mit Deinem Übersetzerhandbuch— eine gekerbte Rippe, eine gekrümmte Schaufel. Dein Talmud beinah ein Augenlid. Auf der Veranda, das fast Gesagte gefüllt mit Schweigen. Der Wortköder abdriftend. Du hast mich hierher geführt als die Hoffnung dahinschwand. Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin? Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin?   Herr Antschel With your translator’s book— a notched rib, a kneed shovel. Your Talmud half like an eyelid. On the porch, your almost-mouthed, filled with silence. The wordbait drifting. …

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Six Days of Snow

By | Poetry

Push aside the screen door and see strata upon strata of snow. Notice the elemental shifts in light, a palette of backlit whites lined with blue-gray where each snowfall stopped and the next started, a dutiful record of its own making. It is the laying on of snow upon sleep, upon bulbs put there by hands, upon tunnels through soil and the breathing fur within them. Snow laying itself down upon sleeping you, a sleep not solved by light. You through whom light fell onto me.  That was how it happened once. Light fell through you, and I came awake.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Jason With Me at the Zoo The summer night is radiantly cool. You’d have liked it. You’d have loved the chili-pepper of the rose, white daisies at the zoo, the shell’s roseate innards, the orangey scarlet ibis picking his lit way along the wood-chip path and penguins flittering through the pond like bats. “Flying is a kind of swimming,” someone wrote; but swimming is a kind of flying, too, and you were a mighty swimmer, but now you hold so still where you lie nailed to the ground, your eyes up against the pine, your beautiful jaw uptilted like a man who can’t get enough of gazing at the stars spangled across the summer sky so that he tightly shuts his lids and will not open them again.   God’s Leash God’s leash is on me. The last time I touched you it seemed you were already more than halfway his. I did not believe you would outlast the night. You said goodbye in the hospital corridor, as if you might still, somehow, shake off the holy collar like a priest laying down his robe. You stumbled at the door as full of running sores as Job. Perhaps you were on your way somewhere you wanted to be when G-d said heel and dragged you to shore.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

The Bette Davis Mosh

By & | Poetry

In the mosh pit even the unluckiest get a chance to dance akimbo. They bring their hands to each other and loofah. In the mosh pit it’s a burning of our previous body, the one that taught us how to dance in synchronicity. Hierarchies bicker with lowerarchies. Everything flies by. Everything feels like a boulder on the cheek. Alignment and spacing are frivolous. Look! someone says from the fractal edge of the mosh pit which has undergone thousands of iterations and now resembles Bette Davis. Oh, look! She throws her body into our midst and is divided among us like a steak. With vengeance she swings softballs into space.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Annunciation Aimed where the blue cloak folds away, revealing a white brow set in carmine, gliding along stippled lines—It arrives. You can ordain nothing, forbid nothing. Your hands, folded, complete an oval, red as the draped bed in the room behind you, door ajar to one you cannot name. You do not see God’s ardent bird. Each time, a blazing angel hushes you.   Threshold (for my son) Winter light pours in over my inward face, my hand at rest, enormity of my belly, sprigged with flannel buds. It is three days past your due date. Your father snaps the photo. What else to do? Grown so big, I am disappearing. Dolphin-slippery, you would wake me. I placed your father’s hand, astonished, over moving waters; showing off at somersaults, you had our attention; we dwelled on you as on a waxing moon. Now, you curl nautilus-tight, shining. A child slips in from a red brick building over there, takes my colored pencils. Waking, I don’t mind. I want the sea he’s drawing, flying fish, monsters, sea horses rocking through salt-spume, sun not yet fixed in the right hand corner. Beside the window, the little painting, your father’s. I will take it with us — greens, blues, ochre. Body seizing, I will slip into its disappearing mountains, carded wool clouds, imagine taking you there. The midwife’s kind voice will fall away. Now, the clock’s pendulum tocks, time stopped. The elevator’s steel cable complains in the chute. UPS trucks rumble from the depot down the street, brown-wrapped packages stacked and ready. We once made a whole. We are waiting for you now, as if listening for snowfall.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Reading The Illiad The sons of the sons of the sons go on fighting the sons of the sons of other sons or even the same sons and it is forever and it is now in these lines with their long vowels we will only hear in echoes in the names we learned as children for cartoonish gods and tender parts of our own anatomy—a rubbery tug in back of the ankle— but still the language surviving improbably down these thousands of years to this early spring morning with some of its trees slipping new leaves through light wind and the bare locust still black and unmoving as the Styx, as the river of absence.  And the killing surviving within that unmoving river of language we enter at any point to find the filthy darkness cowling across an almost anonymous pair of eyes, the bronze armor leadening to earth as though death entered us first as speech, as though it were given to us at birth with these signs we cluster out of the air or trace so carefully over ruled lines.  So that it lives in us as a precision or practice, with the clouded exactness of memory, and we grow toward it as if the river should flow to its source, or as when a tree, some giant fir, falls on a mountainside after a blizzard has fastened over its branches—the wind grinds it until the great roots start to shiver—and the snow once weighting the branches resurrects in a cloud that seconds the storm, that bodies the air.   Sleep Disorder The edges filling in like a city that’s sinking, a city that’s been lost to its own element and has found another, less hospitable but not out of the question.  And when the doctor shone the spectrum directly into my eye I could see the capillaries forking lightning about the retina, shredding up the blood sky. For days the images reversing themselves back there had been puckering away from the center like spacetime sinkholing …

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Otavalo Plaza

By | Poetry

Subtract the Panamerican heading North and South, the cobble stone streets leading from the highway to the Parque Principal and the grotto of the Virgin, and the Cross beyond. The Municipio and Beto’s tienda who sells good wines and fine cheese; subtract them too.  Quiten la iglesia of sorrows eternos, the Mormon center and store front Evangelicos strumming guitar passage to Jesus, the bust of Rumiñauhui, and the legends of those last Incas. Take away the loud speakers in the Plaza de Ponchos, the almuerzos left so the dead loved ones may eat in the Campo Santo —the Holy Ground. Take the tourists back to their busses and the busses back to Quito.  Let old mestizos halt the ancient handball game, played each dusk at one end of the plaza in homage to the setting sun.  And the Runakunata anchuchichik with their lives of looms and corn and dreams of SUV’s. The simple streams and stones lying in the streams defining East and West.  The rivers who find rivers who find bays and oceans. Urkukunata kuyuchichik, Let the mountains move, —erase them. Let the silence of mountains be erased that the voice of a woman —as she gathers the words and the names of a new song into her basket— be heard.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Anteroom “I don’t want to alarm you, but . . . . ” Don’t but strikes the eardrum first. And then that ellipsis trailing its wake of silence. What? what? Tonight you have been detained in the holding tank of gel and electrodes where a stylus monitors your quaking. Again you are made to repeat your name. In the hush and babble of the ER the whitecoats hover and confer. Lucky you! Not a single positive this time. You may go home to that other life with its soothing clatter, you’ve rehearsed the required emotions. Once again you have passed the test for the wrong disaster. White Heat Last Friday a man was struck by lightning. He lives to tell it: “My friends heard it strike, saw smoke rising from my body. My shoes flew off!” In the front page photo he looks abashed. Heat gathers drop by drop till the cloud cannot contain it. Lightning sizzles across in a burst of ozone and the whole sky blanches. I love the wild brilliance that will not last. My grandma was afraid of lightning: “If you feel a storm coming, cover your head and pray.”  Her house in the old country had a roof of straw. I don’t believe in the god of lightning anymore. My house is stucco and wood. I’m afraid of safety. When the lights go out I’m awake at the window, watching that live wire ignite the fire of water and air that can turn us to ash.