Contributions by Gerry LaFemina

On Ekphrastics

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Poetics, Prose

For the last few years, I’ve been working with the Italian photographer Leila Myftija, writing poems in dialogue with her photographs. The photos are varied: one depicts a group of children at the beach, another is a close up of a section of an industrial grate, another a wicker ball. Some conjure my imagination immediately, …

For Future Reference: Notes on a Writer’s Desk

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Poetics, Prose

Like a lot of people these days, my students have a stated conviction that the internet is better than print materials for research. It’s easy to think so. If you know what you’re looking for it may even be true. Need to know what a grackle eats? You can find out. Want to know the …

Skill Set: Notes on Tom Lux, Poetry, and Teaching

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Poetics

In the two months or so since Tom Lux died, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about what it means to have been his student, which in turn has led me to thinking about what it means to be a teacher of poetry. Much, of course, has been written on this topic, and much …

The Eternal Return of the Same

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Poetics, Prose

Sometime in the late nineties a writer friend of mine said that if you ever wanted to write a Charles Simic poem all you needed was the moon, an alley, a young child, a woman in a babushka, and perhaps a chicken. I thought of this recently after finishing up a first draft of a …

Ten New Year’s Resolutions for American Poetry, 2017

By | Blog Archives, Prose

These are resolutions for poetry. For readers. For writers. For what’s possible. For some, they may seem curmudgeonly. So be it. For some, they might seem frivolous. So what? We live in a time when there are more poems being written, being published in journals, published in anthologies and books, and yet, as someone who’s …

Confessions of a Could-be Confessional Poet

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Prose

A recent collection of essays, After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography, raises some issues about confessionalism, autobiography, and the role of the lyric I. Confessionalism, that moniker lodged against Lowell by M.L. Rosenthal that was then owned by an entire school of poetry, has of course led to numerous classroom discussions in which students declared that …

Specs of Dust

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Poetics, Prose

One might think the title is a typo, that I meant “Specks of Dust.”  Speck, from the Middle English “specke” and deeper still to Old English, “specca,” meaning “a small spot, mark, or discolorization” (American Heritage Dictionary).  But it’s no typo. In this case I’m referencing the Latinate “specere”—to look at, to see. As poets, …

On Writing with Duende

By | Blog Archives, Gerry LaFemina, Prose

The question becomes, in the end, why should I care about your subject matter? Think about it: why should anybody care about the subject matter of your poems? This isn’t meant to be harsh—just a reality check. If your poem is solely about content, solely about things you’ve already known and thought, what insight does …