News

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Blue Afternoon: The Middle Distance

By | Poetry

I need more light now than when I was young, holding books at that middle distance to let bifocals do their work. As a result I find myself, when I look up from the page, gazing unfocused into something I can’t quite see the name for. It takes a moment, now, to make the shift from close detail, from the word, to whatever’s out the window. Summer at the beach, I am rapt with distance, book on the sand beside me while I stare and stare not at the lace of waves or shells that wash in and drift back out a few times before depositing themselves quietly below the tideline, but at the blue on blue horizon line, the faint haze that obscures the farthest ships, the Boston skyline I saw once on the clearest afternoon, or thought I did. I stare at nothing with a form, at a whisper, at a fade from blue to gray to duller blue then blue again. I don’t know what it is I think I see but there is plenty of it, this light, every light, the long blue afternoon, my eyes at rest past the struggle of the middle distance, past the insect words that quiver on the page, past everything but light and light itself, beyond the blurred horizon and all the visible names of things.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Three Poems

By | Poetry

Jebby Eldon I found Jebby Eldon drowning and fished him out crazy like sand scuffed into wood. A year later he plays music at Midkiff’s Bar, plays jazz that scrambles pale smoke into some wild, clanky riffs. Sometimes he helps me load the barge or takes his old mutt hound hunting grouse on his daddy’s farm, where birds fly out like pine needles in a devil breeze, and blue lizards rustle across a rock bluff like fossils chiseled from midair. Jebby shoots nothing, just laughs along the lake fence where he should be dead. He tells me a young albino owl has pulled its wings from a pine knot, has fringed all its howling into another man’s life. Jebby says I shoulda left him water-logged.   The Capehill Barge I float some cars to the island. Jebby says they’ll be the last ridden across Capehill’s flat crater pig path, moonlight frizzing into snow and pumice. The barge stays cold tonight and its shaky steel has flowered against Old Moody’s Landing like a rusty package swapped for some stars and music. But Jebby sings his money and I sing some crablegs and brew, a sour breezy comfort with our haul, with all these trembled beach cabins paled for another night’s Christmas.   The Prize Bull Hobey and Jebby raced one night, caught the slant of a roof, and flew their dirt bikes past Ruben Coyle’s prize bull. They yelped like fools haunted by the deepest, coldest mud sunk in a thaw. And the bull roughed at them like a tank, knocked Hobey against a fence post, bounced Jebby two flips against a cattle guard. I laughed three days after I patched them. Made their eyes look like one slow twitching burl-knot hating sunlight. They slumped to Betty’s house, and she laughed, too—said the air won’t breathe itself without some jokes, and here’s two fine ones, joined in their bruises. I hear the boys done raced again on Coyle’s land. I hear the bull has started goring shadows.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Three Poems (in translation)

By & | Poetry

Telemachus Telemachos Das Gemach meines Vaters öffnete sich zweimal, hob dann auf Flügeln ab. Ich bin die Sirene, Vater— Du der Schall. Gegen die Stille—Wundsporen. Ein Schrei kann die Grabenwand nicht durchdringen. Er wird, er wird benannt, er wird Stein genannt.   Telemachus My father’s room opened twice, then wing-lifted. I am the Siren, father— you, the sound. Against stillness—wound spores. A cry cannot penetrate the rift-wall. It is, it is named, it is named stone.   Herr Antschel Herr Antschel Mit Deinem Übersetzerhandbuch— eine gekerbte Rippe, eine gekrümmte Schaufel. Dein Talmud beinah ein Augenlid. Auf der Veranda, das fast Gesagte gefüllt mit Schweigen. Der Wortköder abdriftend. Du hast mich hierher geführt als die Hoffnung dahinschwand. Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin? Wohin wurde ich sonst gahin?   Herr Antschel With your translator’s book— a notched rib, a kneed shovel. Your Talmud half like an eyelid. On the porch, your almost-mouthed, filled with silence. The wordbait drifting. …

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Six Days of Snow

By | Poetry

Push aside the screen door and see strata upon strata of snow. Notice the elemental shifts in light, a palette of backlit whites lined with blue-gray where each snowfall stopped and the next started, a dutiful record of its own making. It is the laying on of snow upon sleep, upon bulbs put there by hands, upon tunnels through soil and the breathing fur within them. Snow laying itself down upon sleeping you, a sleep not solved by light. You through whom light fell onto me.  That was how it happened once. Light fell through you, and I came awake.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Jason With Me at the Zoo The summer night is radiantly cool. You’d have liked it. You’d have loved the chili-pepper of the rose, white daisies at the zoo, the shell’s roseate innards, the orangey scarlet ibis picking his lit way along the wood-chip path and penguins flittering through the pond like bats. “Flying is a kind of swimming,” someone wrote; but swimming is a kind of flying, too, and you were a mighty swimmer, but now you hold so still where you lie nailed to the ground, your eyes up against the pine, your beautiful jaw uptilted like a man who can’t get enough of gazing at the stars spangled across the summer sky so that he tightly shuts his lids and will not open them again.   God’s Leash God’s leash is on me. The last time I touched you it seemed you were already more than halfway his. I did not believe you would outlast the night. You said goodbye in the hospital corridor, as if you might still, somehow, shake off the holy collar like a priest laying down his robe. You stumbled at the door as full of running sores as Job. Perhaps you were on your way somewhere you wanted to be when G-d said heel and dragged you to shore.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

The Bette Davis Mosh

By & | Poetry

In the mosh pit even the unluckiest get a chance to dance akimbo. They bring their hands to each other and loofah. In the mosh pit it’s a burning of our previous body, the one that taught us how to dance in synchronicity. Hierarchies bicker with lowerarchies. Everything flies by. Everything feels like a boulder on the cheek. Alignment and spacing are frivolous. Look! someone says from the fractal edge of the mosh pit which has undergone thousands of iterations and now resembles Bette Davis. Oh, look! She throws her body into our midst and is divided among us like a steak. With vengeance she swings softballs into space.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Annunciation Aimed where the blue cloak folds away, revealing a white brow set in carmine, gliding along stippled lines—It arrives. You can ordain nothing, forbid nothing. Your hands, folded, complete an oval, red as the draped bed in the room behind you, door ajar to one you cannot name. You do not see God’s ardent bird. Each time, a blazing angel hushes you.   Threshold (for my son) Winter light pours in over my inward face, my hand at rest, enormity of my belly, sprigged with flannel buds. It is three days past your due date. Your father snaps the photo. What else to do? Grown so big, I am disappearing. Dolphin-slippery, you would wake me. I placed your father’s hand, astonished, over moving waters; showing off at somersaults, you had our attention; we dwelled on you as on a waxing moon. Now, you curl nautilus-tight, shining. A child slips in from a red brick building over there, takes my colored pencils. Waking, I don’t mind. I want the sea he’s drawing, flying fish, monsters, sea horses rocking through salt-spume, sun not yet fixed in the right hand corner. Beside the window, the little painting, your father’s. I will take it with us — greens, blues, ochre. Body seizing, I will slip into its disappearing mountains, carded wool clouds, imagine taking you there. The midwife’s kind voice will fall away. Now, the clock’s pendulum tocks, time stopped. The elevator’s steel cable complains in the chute. UPS trucks rumble from the depot down the street, brown-wrapped packages stacked and ready. We once made a whole. We are waiting for you now, as if listening for snowfall.

Issue 5 | Summer 2009

Two Poems

By | Poetry

Reading The Illiad The sons of the sons of the sons go on fighting the sons of the sons of other sons or even the same sons and it is forever and it is now in these lines with their long vowels we will only hear in echoes in the names we learned as children for cartoonish gods and tender parts of our own anatomy—a rubbery tug in back of the ankle— but still the language surviving improbably down these thousands of years to this early spring morning with some of its trees slipping new leaves through light wind and the bare locust still black and unmoving as the Styx, as the river of absence.  And the killing surviving within that unmoving river of language we enter at any point to find the filthy darkness cowling across an almost anonymous pair of eyes, the bronze armor leadening to earth as though death entered us first as speech, as though it were given to us at birth with these signs we cluster out of the air or trace so carefully over ruled lines.  So that it lives in us as a precision or practice, with the clouded exactness of memory, and we grow toward it as if the river should flow to its source, or as when a tree, some giant fir, falls on a mountainside after a blizzard has fastened over its branches—the wind grinds it until the great roots start to shiver—and the snow once weighting the branches resurrects in a cloud that seconds the storm, that bodies the air.   Sleep Disorder The edges filling in like a city that’s sinking, a city that’s been lost to its own element and has found another, less hospitable but not out of the question.  And when the doctor shone the spectrum directly into my eye I could see the capillaries forking lightning about the retina, shredding up the blood sky. For days the images reversing themselves back there had been puckering away from the center like spacetime sinkholing …